News

Announcement

Yesterday, on November 13, 2018, the General Meeting of “Helsinki Association” Human Rights NGO took place. Among the agenda items, the members of the meeting discussed and satisfied Arayik Papikyan's request for his renunciation from the membership of the organization’s Board and temporarily suspending his membership of “Helsinki Association” NGO. “Helsinki Association” NGO
  • Created on .
  • Hits: 233
0
0
0
s2sdefault

Statement

During the recent days, within the framework of discussions on certain events and developments, and on social networking sites too, hate speeches and manifestation of discrimination have been widely spread. Moreover, both individuals and organizations, as well as human rights defenders are being targeted, which is more than alarming. Attaching much importance to fundamental principles of a democratic society, such as the freedom of expression and opinion, provision of free access to information and dissemination, yet “Helsinki Association” human rights NGO condemns hate speech or manifestation of discrimination. Application of or any attempt of pressure against a human rights defender is impermissible; especially when it is conditioned by his/her activities.
  • Created on .
  • Hits: 232
0
0
0
s2sdefault

Fake news, data collection, and the challenge to democracy

The internet is growing less free around the world, and democracy itself is withering under its influence.

Disinformation and propaganda disseminated online have poisoned the public sphere. The unbridled collection of personal data has broken down traditional notions of privacy. And a cohort of countries is moving toward digital authoritarianism by embracing the Chinese model of extensive censorship and automated surveillance systems. As a result of these trends, global internet freedom declined for the eighth consecutive year in 2018.

Of the 19 countries with overall score improvements, two—Armenia and the Gambia—earned upgrades in their internet freedom status.

Armenia rose from Partly Free to Free after citizens successfully used social media platforms, communication apps, and live-streaming services to bring about political change in the country’s Velvet Revolution in April.

The Gambia jumped from Not Free to Partly Free, as restrictions have eased and users have posted content more freely since longtime dictator Yahya Jammeh was forced from office in early 2017. However, many draconian laws enacted under the former regime are still in place. While Ethiopia remained highly repressive, a new prime minister appointed in April 2018 immediately moved to reduce tight internet restrictions and promised broader reforms. Prominent bloggers were released from prison, and citizens felt more free to speak out on social media and participate in their country’s potential transition from authoritarian rule.

For more details you can visit: https://bit.ly/2P7TsBX
  • Created on .
  • Hits: 186
0
0
0
s2sdefault
logoUSAIDlogo23logo

This web-site creation was made possible by the support of Counterpart International’s Civil Society and Local Government Support Program and the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International through “Helsinki Associaiton”. Content, views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s), and the responsibility of Helsinki Association and do not necessarily reflect the views of Counterpart Armenia, USAID or the United States Government.” 

Designed by Hakob Jaghatspanyan Copyright © 2013 Helsinki Association